Monthly Archives: March 2012

Projectione at Riley Hospital for Children

Indianna Design/Fabrication Studio Projectione recently completed a large-scale installation at the still-under-construction Simon Family Tower at the Riley Hospital for Children. The video above chronicles the installation, and provides fun insight into the complexities of actually installing such an ambitious element in a project. The Sunrise installation covers 768 feet of the first floor atrium and includes over 3800 unique components making up the image and surface, each with a different color, scale, and distance from the wall. From Projectione’s press release:

The Riley Sunrise aims at representing imagery at multiple scales for all audiences. The vibrancy of the colors and symbolism of each shape or “pixel” speaks to the child, peaking their interest and lifting their spirits. The complexity and patterns generated speak to all generations and encourage discussion and interpretation. Our concept is an abstraction of an image into its main colors and uses graphic symbols as the representation of each pixel. Each symbol is independently mounted and varies its distance from the wall, creating a three dimensional graphic that is read from across the room and up close. Because of the 3D variation, the graphic will visually change as users walk by and can be experienced differently each time….Our hope is that these super-graphics can serve as a pleasant distraction for visitors of the hospital and lead to discussions that can re-focus a conversation towards something positive and uplifting.

 

(via archdaily)

“Hospitals are not Hotels”

An important opinion piece from this week’s NY Times, which reminds us that even in the best built environment, with the most earnest attempt to treat patients as people, much of the healthcare experience is going to be fundamentally difficult for those experiencing it. From the article:

“The survey evaluates behaviors that are integral to high-quality care: How good was the communication in the hospital? Were patients educated about all new medications? On discharge, were the instructions the patient received clear?

These are important questions. But implied in the proposal is a troubling misapprehension of how unpleasant a lot of actual health care is. The survey measures the “patient experience of care” to generate information important to “consumers.” Put colloquially, it evaluates hospital patients’ level of satisfaction.

The problem with this metric is that a lot of hospital care is, like pleurodesis, invasive, painful and even dehumanizing. Surgery leaves incisional pain as well as internal hurts from the removal of a gallbladder or tumor, or the repair of a broken bone. Chemotherapy weakens the immune system. We might like to say it shouldn’t be, but physical pain, and its concomitant emotional suffering, tend to be inseparable from standard care.”